With the official 2020 Census count starting in just four months, new population estimates for Pittsburgh and Allegheny County indicate that the official count may show the region truly has turned a corner.

Figures from the Census Bureau’s 2018 American Community Survey released Thursday show that for the first time in more than half a century, the city and county both could have relatively stable populations in the next official census in 2020.

The survey’s estimate – a weighted figure based on survey results over the five prior years – was that the city’s population in 2018 was 303,587, just slightly less than the 305,704 the city had in the official 2010 Census. And the county estimate for 2018 was 1,225,561, which would be slightly above the 1,223,066 in 2010.

Neither of the projected figures may sound dramatic. But after Allegheny County lost population in each of the past five official census going back to 1970 and the city lost people in each of the prior six going back to 1960, a stable count would be reason for a party.

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We’ve updated the SPC Data Library “Visualize: SPC Tableau” with the recently-released 2014-2018 American Community Survey data. Our interactive Tableau dashboard now includes 2009-2013 and 2014-2018 ACS data, which is the most current Census data available. The dashboard can display a variety of indicators and data comparisons by municipality, county, and region, based on user selections.

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Lawrence County Commissioner Steve Craig has briefcases, folders and other office items stacked inside of his office door, free to any taker who wants them.

Craig is cleaning out his office in anticipation of his last day of work Jan. 3, 2020, which is also his 66th birthday. Having served the county 31 years, first as a planner and planning director and later as an elected commissioner for 16 years, he opted to not seek re-election this year.

He’s ready to be done with it all, he said.

Craig, who typically sports a casual and relaxed professional look, began his career as a planner for a consulting firm, then as a project planner in the governor’s office in the Virgin Islands in Charles County, St. Croix. He also worked for a company that did re-use planning for old school buildings.

He joined the Lawrence County planning staff in 1981.

“Tony Mottle hired me,” he said. Mottle was the director of planning then, and when Mottle left to take a state government job in 1985, Craig advanced into his position.

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The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation has started the phaseout of a downtown Indiana traffic signal.

District 10 officials in White Township said that the traffic signal at Philadelphia and 11th streets will begin operating on flash mode on Monday at 10 a.m.

A spokeswoman said the signal will flash yellow on Philadelphia Street and red on 11th Street, while stop signs will be placed on the 11th Street approaches.

A flashing yellow light means caution, while a flashing red light has the same meaning as a stop sign.

PennDOT said it will study and monitor the intersection during the flashing operation, in preparation for the removal of the traffic signal in the spring as part of the Philadelphia Street Bridge Replacement Project.

It is a planned $3.9 million replacement of two bridges or culverts, one of which carries Philadelphia Street over Whites Run. The other carries Philadelphia Street, where it is part of state Route 286, over Marsh Run.

Read the full story at indianagazette.com

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Before the newly elected Butler County commissioners took office in 2016, they met to agree upon priorities and goals — not only for their local municipalities, but also to elevate the strengths that the rural county brought to the region.

That initial meeting “set the tone” for years of collaboration, said Republican Commissioner Leslie Osche — who works alongside her fellow Commissioners Kevin Boozel, a Democrat, and Kim Geyer, a Republican — and also across county and party lines with Allegheny County’s Democratic executive, Rich Fitzgerald.

“Any one of us could pick up the phone and call Rich,” Mr. Boozel said.

That bipartisan behavior has earned the four elected officials the inaugural Moe Coleman Award, named after the late social worker, public servant and founder of the University of Pittsburgh’s Institute of Politics, who was known for bringing minds together.

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